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20121222
20121222
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's reacting, at some point we will become greece, there aren't any more hypothesis. >> charles, why are they still relatively calm? i think they're relatively calm because of what charlie said. the markets believe we will get a deal. the leadership is trying to get a deal, but it's not easy and by the way by the way-- >> adam, adam. >> charlie, not the end of the world. >> markets like short-term fixes, too. and just because-- >> markets like money printing and. >> neil: by the way, i know i might offend some of you market enthusiasts here, but markets can be wrong and markets might be satisfied. >> they're always wrong. >> neil: a short-term gift and remember the first tarp vote rejected and the market fell about 800 points and run back together and get a deal going and the market ends up being 4,000 points lower a few months later. so, ben, my worry is basing everything you do on a market selloff. >> well, the markets are always wrong, neil because they change the next day or the next hour. and for long periods of time, they have a modest degree of predicted value. >> neil: would
in greece this week over the massacre of innocents, but agreeing how to prevent such killings in the future is bound to divide the country for months to come. >> our north america editor reporting. here in washington today, there was a major announcement regarding president obama's cabinet. massachusetts senator john kerry was nominated to be the next secretary of state. after confirmation, the former presidential candidate will succeed hillary clinton to serve as america's top diplomat. so what can we expect from him in that role? for answers, i spoke to the former u.s. state department spokesman. of course, americans united nations ambassador, susan rice, was the top favorite. how effective will john kerry be? >> he has great spirits. in a sense, the obama administration has used him very effectively in the past four years. he was first on the ground in copenhagen with the climate change negotiations. he was inserted into the troubled relationship the united states has with pakistan. he has had effective conversations with president karzai, and he did some yeoman's work when it came to ne
or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my family in the peace and respite of possibility cello. well, you know, the road was open. he could have gone. new york, philadelphia, williamsburg, richmond, paris, london, hold and, i mean, he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it. because as a young man he'd entered into what he called the bold and doubtful election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way few historical events, i think, have grabbed any generation or any man. i think he thought of the re
and "detroit city is the place to be: the afterlife of an american metropolis" -- rome and greece, sort of when it becomes i have no idea. >> i am -- >> my former neighbor. >> great neighbor. >> my question is i love detroit. tremendously. in love with the city still. back now six years and every day i find something new and fall in love with and in the city and not outside the city and my question is what neighborhood or area do you find most fascinating? this is either the core or the bombshell, you had to go there. >> it is our street. this was a weird moment of serendipity. i was looking for a semi furnished apartment and found that on craigslist and rented the place, the single block at service street which is not far from where you grew up. >> when i grew up the bad things we did -- there were some shops back there. >> i used to make delivery in the butcher shop. >> were people living in a while back then? >> i don't think so. my interaction with the business owners on that street who did not want me and my friends doing what we were doing. >> it change in four years since i've rented tha
. there are solutions to this. this is not europe. this is not greece. there are solutions. it's the politics that mess everything up. >> yeah. you're absolutely right. getting back to the issue of tax rates, it looked like we were getting closer. boehner offered to raise mate raitts for those making more than a million dollars a year, and the rate would only increase on the amount of money you earn over a million dollars a year. just raising those rates were a major concession for any republican. president obama, who insists on letting the bush tax cults expire for earns making more than $250,000, or at least that's how he presented it during the campaign, offered to let those taxes rise on those making more than $400,000 a year. we're talking marginal rates then so, that would be only on income above $400,000. by the way, mark, $370,000 a year is what puts you into the top 1% here. you're an economist. all those income levels, 250, 400, a million, flying around for raising rates, what in your opinion is the breakoff point at which raising rates would substantially hurt the economy? >> well, i mean, i
, especially if greece is right that the judicial review is that going to extend to outside organizations. adults think thailand is that close to afghanistan. geographic proximity is the watchword for detention authority to offer that lax judicial review, but i think, as did play a very clear role in legislating for those cases where they're will be constitutionally require judicial review in india think that if there is every concern we might take advantage of the decision, which i think he easily be taken advantage of, congress did say in cases of individuals picked up outside the united states and not in as on of active combat operation, here is some minimal steps toward procedures that the government must follow which would go a long way toward obviating the concerns that tries to raise, leaving the battlefield issues for another day because i don't think the issue is how many people are on the battlefield in afghanistan. the reality is, as our active combat operations wind down, that number is decreasing to zero. the question is, when we picked up pirates in the gulf of aden, when we
a self-induced one because of the fiscal cliff. it's not greece. it's not like the u.s. is being forced to act right now. the u.s. has a medium and long-term problem with entitlements and population. if politicians on both sides of the aisle could get together and kind of do a down payment for the long-term entitlement issue, that would give them the room to not only -- would there be sort of benefits from doing that, but also give them the room to not do so much tightening in the short term when the economy is weak. >> all right, zani, thank you so much. terrific insights. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> well, if you haven't done your christmas shopping yet, now is the time to panic. no, don't panic. our tech expert has some ideas. she'll show you the latest cool gadgets. >>> a look into what's next in the culinary world. cool tools and strong drinks. so we're going to make a drink called the thai basil dhaka re, and we use liquid nitrogen to freeze and crush up herbs. this is thai basil. here is the main part of the technique. pour liquid nitrogen on the herb. liquid nitrogen is go
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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